Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

February 11, 2018 – A Tufted Titmouse holds a momentary pose while foraging with a flock of seven other Titmice for seeds and nuts through the leaf litter this past week. These little birds upon finding a seed, that is to large to swallow, will perch on a small limb or log with the seed held between its’ feet and hammer away with there beak breaking the seed into smaller manageable bits. You may hear the song of the Tufted Titmouse before actually seeing the little bird. One song that is rich and clear and echoes through the woods on a spring morning, sounds like peter-peter-peter. The powerful sound from a little bird will undoubtedly stop you in your tracks and briefly draw your attention away from your mission as you search for the delightful songster.

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse breaking seed

The Fox Sparrow

Fox Sparrow

The Red Fox Sparrow

October 25, 2017 – A large stocky and vibrant rufous Fox Sparrow momentarily strikes a pose on the branch of a thick bush were it had been spending the morning on the ground below scratching the earth and kicking leaf litter in search of insects. Fox Sparrows spend the winter in the southern parts Illinois and the states south from Texas to the east coast. There are four groups of Fox Sparrows that are seen in North America but in Illinois we have the red group which nests during the warm months from Alaska to eastern Canada. This bird with its’ impressive size and red color really catches a person eye and is easy to distinguish between other heavily streaked sparrows and thrushes.

Fox Sparrow

Fox Sparrow

A Bird of a Different Feather

Leucistic Starling

Leucistic Starling

October 13, 2017 – A flash of white caught my eye as I was driving past a partially harvested field of soybeans in Iroquois county this past Friday the 13th. A flock of over 50 European Starlings were feeding on the ground near the edge of the field when I noticed the leucistic bird of the same species. Leucism is genetic condition that prevents melanin pigments to be deposited into the feathers properly. The lack of melanin pigments can cause a range of visible abnormality in the plumage color of birds. The results of this condition can manifest from an faint washed out look barely showing any semblance to a birds normal strong color patterns, to showing just small patches of white feathers lacking pigment. In some cases the affects of leucism can even produce a white bird that appears completely devoid of any plumage color.

European Starlings

European Starlings

Grasshopper Sparrow

Grasshopper Sparrow

Grasshopper Sparrow

July 23, 2017 – While perched on a fence post at the The Nature Conservancy’s Kankakee Sands in Newton county Indiana a Grasshopper Sparrow sings out a song that resembles the sounds of its’ favorite food, the grasshopper. The little songbird has a perfect habitat at the Kankakee Sands with the open grasslands, plenty of insects and a good place for these ground nesting little migrants to have a successful breeding season. The Grasshopper Sparrow has shown a decline in recent years from habitat loss throughout its’ range with the fragmentation and degradation from intensive agriculture. The 2014 state of the birds report has the Grasshopper Sparrow listed as a common bird in steep decline.

Grasshopper Sparrow

Grasshopper Sparrow

The Red-necked Phalarope

Red-necked Phalarope

Red-necked Phalarope

May 26, 2017 – The Red-necked Phalarope is a small delicate looking bird about 7 inches in length with an elegant form and dance like movements as it swims across the water hunting for insects. On a less traveled migratory route the Phalarope is occasionally seen by a lucky few each year in Illinois. The west coast and the western states of North American and off shore on the east coast is the birds normal pattern of migration as it heads for the lakes and ponds on the tundra in the arctic for the nesting season. This spring migration was no exception when I came across a pair in north western Iroquois county in a small flooded area surrounded by corn stubble. The pair were in breeding plumage and were on constant hunt for small worms and insects, at times spinning around in circles in the water churning up a vortex of sediment and exposing perhaps a tasty insect larvae. During the winter the Red-necked Phalarope is out to sea off the coast of Ecuador and Peru with concentrations around the Galapagos Islands where the warm and cold ocean currents meet creating a plankton rich food source for this pelagic species.

Red-necked Phalarope

Red-necked Phalarope