Hawks and Owls

Northern Harrier
A female Northern Harrier perched on a fence post resting but also listening and watching for prey in the grasses along the roadway.

January 21, 2019 – There is snow on the prairie and some of the young bulls in the bison herd at the Kankakee Sands, in Newton county Indiana, challenge each others strength in their play fighting. Butting heads, jumping, and pushing each other until one walks away, but the bested young bull returns for more, unable to resist the challenge. Above in the winter skies, the Rough-legged hawks, in their varied shades of black, brown and white, hover over the cold white blanket pressing down on the sleeping grasses of bleak winter fields. Northern Harriers glide low, back and forth over the prairie at times looking like a kite that has come loose from its’ tether as they drop down on an unwitting prey. Late afternoon the Short-eared owls awaken from their roosts, flying in circles rising up high above the prairie in a group of four or five that soon descend in different directions finding their area to hunt. Perched on a sign or fence post or small tree they are wide eyed and alert, watching with those keen yellow eyes, for any movement surrounding their vantage.

A Short-eared owl is perched and hunting from a low tree surrounded by snow and fog as the last bit of light dims for the day.

The Lapland Longspur

December 31, 2018 – A small bird that is very difficult to see without snow cover, flocks of the Lapland longspur are in our area for the winter. The Arctic bird is easy to spot after a heavy snow. They can be seen in numbers foraging along the windswept and plowed roadways for wild seeds and spilled grain. I counted 50 in several large flocks, that I only noticed because they were flushed from the snowless landscape south of Aroma Park during the Christmas bird count this past Saturday. Keep your eyes open for these long distance migrants in and around the agricultural fields along with another visitor from the north, the beautiful little Snow bunting.


Rough-legged hawk

Rough-legged hawk

Rough-legged hawk perched on a steel cable

December 9, 2018 – Perched on a steel cable above a grassy area a Rough-legged hawk, a large raptor of the high arctic during the summer, keeps an eye out below for prey. The photo shows the feathers covering the legs, extending down to their small feet. The tip of the beak is stained red from a recent kill. The Rough-legged hawks have migrated south out the Arctic and are now on their wintering grounds. The wintering ground of the Rough-legged hawk includes most of the United States, minus the states south of the Ohio river and East of the Mississippi. According to The Cornell lab of Ornithology these wintering hawks feed mostly on voles, mice and shews while in our area of Illinois. I have personally witnessed them on the carrion of a rather large mammal a few winters back. With a wingspan of over 4′ they can’t be missed as they hover and glide over the farm fields and prairies. Watch for them perched on utility poles or on the small branches of trees or even sitting on the ground throughout the winter months.

Short-eared Owls

Short-eared owls

Short-eared owl

November 17, 2018 – A small bird of prey sat perched on an old weathered fence post just before sunset near The Nature Conservancy’s Kankakee Sands restored prairies in Newton county Indiana. The small yellow eyed raptor, about the size of a crow, and sometimes referred to as “the ghost of the grasslands”, is a Short-eared owl. A number of Short-eared owls recently seen at the Kankakee Sands have found the perfect prairie habitat for food and shelter while they spend those cold, dusky winter months waiting for spring. These wintering owls can also be seen in the rural areas of Kankakee and Iroquois counties hunting at dusk or just before sunrise.

House Wren

 House Wren

A little House Wren

October  24, 2018 – A little House wren stops for a moment to look down towards the lower branches of a small leafless bush as it surveys its’ next perch. According to recent reported sightings, reflected in the online eBird species maps of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, many of the House wrens are moving south, pushed by the strong northerly winds and cold air from the higher latitudes. The House wrens will winter in the southern third of the United States south into Mexico. Of course the little songbirds are still being seen in the area, but in greatly reduced numbers as the migration continues.

Migrating Palm warbler

Palm warbler

A southbound migrating Palm warbler

October 15, 2018 – A southbound, migrating Palm warbler in its’ autumn drab blends in quite well as it finds the perfect perch to quickly survey the surroundings. The Palm warbler is known for its’ tail-wagging and this one doesn’t disappoint, showing off those bright yellow feathers under the tail. In an instant though, the little bird is off to continue its’ hunt for insects or seeds among the tall, dried vegetation.

Ruby-throated Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

October 9, 2018 – A tiny Ruby-crowned Kinglet works its’ way up a dried stalk at the edge of a thicket in search of insects in Iroquois county recently. The little bird, which is only 4.3 inches in length, is making its’ way south where it may winter in the southern half of the United States or as far south as Mexico according to The Cornell lab of Ornithology.

Reference:

“Ruby-Crowned Kinglet Overview, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology.” , All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruby-crowned_Kinglet/overview.

Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker

Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker

Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker

September 27, 2018 – A beautiful and colorful female Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker announced its’ arrival as it landed and perched on the branch of a tall snag in Iroquois county. The flickers’ black bib on its’ chest over a peachy light brown color that is covered with black spots from the chest to the belly, is further enhanced with the bright yellow shafts of the tail feathers and a red bar on the nape of the neck. The Northern Flicker is a large and impressive woodpecker that does feed on berries and seed, but its’ primary diet consists of ants, beetles and larvae that can be found in the ground.

Reference:

“Northern Flicker Overview, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology.” , All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/overview.

Common Yellow-throat Warbler

Female Common Yellow-throat Warbler

Female Common Yellow-throat Warbler

September 13, 2018 – A female Common Yellow-throat warbler pauses for only a moment atop some dried thistle standing at the edge of the thick undergrowth. Quickly the little bird vanishes into a maze of green as she searches for insects on top and below every leaf she encounters, at times revealing her location as she flutters from branch to branch in her quest.

Ruby-throated hummingbird

Ruby-throated hummingbird

Male Ruby-throated hummingbird

– A tiny male Ruby-throated hummingbird seems to hold a classical pose for the camera as it stretches it wings back spreading its’ tail feathers in the low light shadows of the morning sun. The summer visitors to the eastern half of North America for the breeding season will be migrating south in late August and will be gone by late October.