Ruby-throated Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

October 9, 2018 – A tiny Ruby-crowned Kinglet works its’ way up a dried stalk at the edge of a thicket in search of insects in Iroquois county recently. The little bird, which is only 4.3 inches in length, is making its’ way south where it may winter in the southern half of the United States or as far south as Mexico according to The Cornell lab of Ornithology.

Reference:

“Ruby-Crowned Kinglet Overview, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology.” , All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ruby-crowned_Kinglet/overview.

Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker

Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker

Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker

September 27, 2018 – A beautiful and colorful female Yellow-shafted Northern Flicker announced its’ arrival as it landed and perched on the branch of a tall snag in Iroquois county. The flickers’ black bib on its’ chest over a peachy light brown color that is covered with black spots from the chest to the belly, is further enhanced with the bright yellow shafts of the tail feathers and a red bar on the nape of the neck. The Northern Flicker is a large and impressive woodpecker that does feed on berries and seed, but its’ primary diet consists of ants, beetles and larvae that can be found in the ground.

Reference:

“Northern Flicker Overview, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology.” , All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Flicker/overview.

Common Green Darner

 Common Green Darner

Common Green Darner

July 22, 2018 – The dragonfly has had its’ place in the myth and symbolism of humans for thousands of years, both good and evil has manifested in the folklore and the art of both prehistoric and modern humans. From the primitive cave paintings to the Art Nouveau dragonfly pendants there is no denying that their beauty is an inspiration. Their evolution began over 300 million years ago, as some fossil records show amazing giant dragonfly like insects with wingspans of over two feet. But from a different path millions of years ago our modern dragonfly evolved. The modern dragonfly is much smaller, the largest dragonfly in North America is the Giant Green Darner of the Southwest that has a wingspan of around five inches. Here in Illinois we have the Common Green Darner that looks similar to the Giant Green Darner but it is a little smaller with a wingspan of a little over three inches. The photo shows the Common Green Darner clinging to a corn stalk leaf where many others were feeding along a grassy road in rural Iroquois county.

Dragonflies

Twelve Spotted Skimmer

Twelve Spotted Skimmer

June 26, 2018 – Along the uncut rural roadsides and in the meadows where the butterflies go, along the creeks and over the sparkling waters of ponds, the delightful summer air is in motion with dragonflies of many shapes and sizes with a variety of color patterns. Halloween Pennants, Common Whitetails, Eastern Pondhawks, Widow Skimmers and other species like the Twelve Spotted Skimmer which is found throughout the U.S. and southern Canada is shown in the photo perched on a dried weed in Iroquois county. Mostly unnoticed or ignored, dragonflies can only really be appreciated for their unique beauty and color patterns when seen through binoculars or a camera zoom.

Widow Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Upland Sandpiper

Adult Upland Sandpiper

Adult Upland sandpiper moving through the new soybeans wary of the photographer and vocalizing June 2018

June 18, 2018 – An Upland sandpiper, a bird that spends the winter as far south as Argentina and Uruguay, walks through the new growth of soybeans in a field in Iroquois county recently, the same field where five were spotted the day before. The Upland sandpiper is endangered in Illinois and increasingly rare to even see. An encouraging study that was done in two counties in Central Illinois in 2014 by a team from the University of Illinois has indicated apparent adaptations for a number of grassland species including the Upland sandpiper. The Upland sandpipers are using no-till soybean fields as nesting sites according to wildlife biologist Kelly R. VanBeek who coordinated the 2014 study.

Adult Upland Sandpiper

An adult Upland sandpiper lands on a the gravel road while the roadside is being mowed in June 2017

This is the forth year that I have photographed Upland sandpipers that are using an area in Iroquois county for nesting. Last year I observed a chick with an adult and that event was the exciting confirmation that they were indeed nesting there with some success. With the cooperation of the land owners and farmers we have an opportunity to get a better understanding of why it seems to be working for the Upland sandpipers at this location and possibly encourage some management ideas that can help increase their odds for success. Some simple things like a moratorium on roadside mowing, the spraying of dangerous chemicals or even closing nonessential roads during the nesting season could go a long way towards that goal. With common sense actions and a greater understanding we may find that with just some small tweaks in our behavior we could have a huge positive impact on the struggling Upland sandpiper, a species that needs our prompt focus.

Wilson’s warbler

Wilson's warbler

Wilson’s warbler

May 21, 2018 – A yellow and olive colored Wilson’s warbler with its’ tiny black cap holds fast to a small branch as it momentarily surveys for the next stem to continue its’ hunt for insects. Quickly moving through the understory it disappears for a time. Emerging out of the shadows the small bird hovers at the edge of a bush to catch its’ prey. The little warblers only give brief glimpses, lingering at any one branch for mere seconds, a flitter perhaps to the observer but with a definite purpose to the tiny bird. Wilson’s warblers are a very small warbler, only slightly larger than a Ruby-crowned Kinglet. The little warblers migrate through our area of the Midwest heading north into Canada for the nesting season from their winter home on the Gulf coast from Louisiana, Texas, Mexico and Central America.

The Yellow Warbler

Male Yellow-warbler

Male Yellow-warbler

May 22, 2018 – The Yellow-warbler is considered an early long distance migrant that winters along the coasts of Mexico, the interior of Central America, and south to the equatorial countries in the Amazon basin. Widely distributed, the Yellow-warbler is also found throughout the islands of the Caribbean. A trepidation of these small bright yellow spring migrants can appear without notice as they hunt insects amongst the vivid green leaves of new growth at the edge of a thicket. The little songbirds nest from Mexico north into the northern third of the United States and most of Canada and Alaska. The bright yellow male has bold red-orange brown streaks on the breast sides, the female lacks or may have just a very slight hint of those streaks.

Female Yellow-warbler

Female Yellow-warbler

Summer Tanager

Female Summer Tanager

Female Summer Tanager

May 2, 2018 – A mostly yellow colored, female Summer Tanager was perched and focused on hunting insects, most likely a bee or wasp, at the edge of a wooded thicket recently in Iroquois county. The Summer Tanagers are neotropical migrants and have arrived in Northern Illinois for the nesting season from their wintering range in southern Mexico south to the the Northern half of South America. The male Summer Tanager, striking in color, is the only fully red bird in North America and is more easily noticed in the green canopy of the trees than the female.

Female Summer Tanager

Female Summer Tanager

Backlight Buck

White-tailed Buck

Backlight Buck on the run

January 19, 2018 – Almost silhouetted in the backlight of the morning sun, a spooked White-tailed buck does not waste any time increasing the distance between itself and possible danger. White-tailed deer can reach speeds of 40 mile per hour and easily jump barriers that are 9 feet tall. They have the ability to take to the air and leap an amazing distance of 30 feet while running to escape a threat that is in hot pursuit. In a matter of seconds that buck along with another was across the field, through a small woodlot, down a hillside and into a field of corn stubble well over a half mile away and then like a snowflake in the spring they were gone.

Snow Buntings

Snow Bunting

Snow Bunting

January 19, 2018 – Snow Buntings are a small songbird of the high Arctic, a visitor that can be seen in our area with flocks of Horned Larks and Lapland Longspurs and sometimes in larger flocks of their own species. During the winter months here in Illinois they can be found feeding on dropped seeds along roadways or in the harvested agricultural fields. An interesting fact of these little birds, unlike other birds that can claim and alternate plumage, they only molt once and that is in the late summer. By the time spring rolls around and the Arctic breeding season is underway the browns and tan colored tips of their feathers are worn off showing mostly pure white with coal black wingtips. During their breeding season there are only a few slight differences in the plumage of the female and male.

Snow Bunting

Snow Bunting